Critical literal essay

It is indeed quite curious that neither Lefebvre's The Right to City nor anything else contained in Writings on Cities discusses or mentions the concentration camp. ( The Production of Space is also silent on the subject.) This omission is especially felt during Lefebvre's discussions of the dialectic of urbanization and industrialization: is it not interesting that the Nazis constructed their highly industrialized concentration camps as if they were self-contained little cities and yet never situated these "mini-cities" within any German cities (like factories, they were built in the outskirts or in conquered nations such as Poland)? To Agamben, the answer is "yes." It is this precise topology -- the doubled structure of inclusion (modeled on the city) and exclusion (outskirts) -- that makes the camp the exemplary (urban) space of modern biopolitics. Lefebvre's omission is especially glaring in light of how much attention both Guy Debord and Raoul Vaneigem gave to the similarities between concentration camps and contemporary architecture and urbanism. [7]

Critical literal essay

critical literal essay

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